HTML <q> Tag

The HTML <q> tag represents a quotation from another source.

Browsers usually surround <q> text with quotation marks. If the quotation spans multiple lines, you should use the <blockquote> tag. Most browsers present blockquote text as indented text.

Syntax

The <q> tag is written as <q></q> with the quotation inserted between the start and end tags.

Like this:

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<q>Quotation text here...</q>

Examples

Basic tag usage

CodeResult

Tom Campbell said It's not that you have consciousness, but that you are consciousness.

When NOT to Use the <q> Tag?

The HTML5 specification states that the <q> element must not be used in place of quotation marks that do not represent quotes; for example, it is inappropriate to use the <q> element for marking up sarcastic statements.. This would also include naming a word from within a sentence.

Therefore, the following example should not be marked up using the <q> tag.

CodeResult

I would say "elation" would be the best word to describe my feelings when my project finally came into fruition.

Differences Between HTML 4 & HTML 5

None.

To see more detail on the two versions see HTML5 <q> Tag and HTML4 <q> Tag. Also check out the links to the official specifications below.

Template

Here's a template for the <q> tag with all available attributes for the tag (based on HTML5). These are grouped into attribute types, each type separated by a space. In many cases, you will probably only need one or two (if any) attributes. Simply remove the attributes you don't need.

For more information on attributes for this tag, see HTML5 <q> Tag and HTML4 <q> Tag.

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<q  
 cite=""
 
 accesskey=""
 class=""
 contenteditable=""
 contextmenu=""
 dir=""
 draggable=""
 dropzone=""
 hidden=""
 id=""
 itemid=""
 itemprop=""
 itemref=""
 itemscope=""
 itemtype=""
 lang=""
 spellcheck=""
 style=""
 tabindex=""
 title=""
 translate=""

 onabort=""
 onautocomplete=""
 onautocompleteerror=""
 onblur=""
 oncancel=""
 oncanplay=""
 oncanplaythrough=""
 onchange=""
 onclick=""
 onclose=""
 oncontextmenu=""
 oncuechange=""
 ondblclick=""
 ondrag=""
 ondragend=""
 ondragenter=""
 ondragexit=""
 ondragleave=""
 ondragover=""
 ondragstart=""
 ondrop=""
 ondurationchange=""
 onemptied=""
 onended=""
 onerror=""
 onfocus=""
 oninput=""
 oninvalid=""
 onkeydown=""
 onkeypress=""
 onkeyup=""
 onload=""
 onloadeddata=""
 onloadedmetadata=""
 onloadstart=""
 onmousedown=""
 onmouseenter=""
 onmouseleave=""
 onmousemove=""
 onmouseout=""
 onmouseover=""
 onmouseup=""
 onmousewheel=""
 onpause=""
 onplay=""
 onplaying=""
 onprogress=""
 onratechange=""
 onreset=""
 onresize=""
 onscroll=""
 onseeked=""
 onseeking=""
 onselect=""
 onshow=""
 onsort=""
 onstalled=""
 onsubmit=""
 onsuspend=""
 ontimeupdate=""
 ontoggle=""
 onvolumechange=""
 onwaiting=""
	>
</q>

Tag Details

For more details about the <q> tag, see HTML5 <q> Tag and HTML4 <q> Tag.

Specifications

Here are the official specifications for the <q> element.

What's the Difference?

W3C creates "snapshot" specifications that don't change once defined. So the HTML5 specification won't change once it becomes an official recommendation. WHATWG on the other hand, develops a "living standard" that is updated on a regular basis. In general, you will probably find that the HTML living standard will be more closely aligned to the current W3C draft than to the HTML5 specification.

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